Non-Fiction

by Nick Wood & Zandile Mahlasela

IT TOOK ME (Nick Wood) a good few years before I plucked up the courage to write the 'Other', i.e. to me, someone who was not white and male. I firstly wrote as a 'white woman' in 'God in the Box' (2003), set in an increasingly familiar London. Phew - that was picked up, published - and I wasn't scorned as a 'sexist imposter'! The leap to crossing the 'colour' divide took a bit longer for me though - part of my fear was that, given South Africa's history, it would be seen as a form of colonization of experience. Then, one day, I sat down and thought long and hard about it.

Issue 18 (Feb 2012)
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by Mark Sykes

EVERY NOW AND THEN a sci-fi geek needs a little reassurance that the path he’s chosen is a righteous one. While it’s true that there’s a certain portion of them – sorry, us – that are completely immune to any ridicule being slung their way (for they know their detractors could be silenced with but a wave of the hand and the utterance of a level four banishment spell), there’s a number of geek guys – and girls, of course – who, every now and then, wonder if they’re not just a wee bit old to be learning Klingon, or creating a mini-army of daleks in their basement, or preparing for the day they’ll be picked up by the Xyrilian mothership they’ve been signalling to for the past decade.

Issue 18 (Feb 2012)
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by Joe Vaz

In Issue 18 of Something Wicked we have some astounding stories for you.
First up, on the 7th of Feb, is a bit of dark humour in Summer Hanford’s extremely wry and funny “The Death of Satan and The Imprisonment of God”.
Next up, on the 14th of Feb, is a fantastic piece of near-future SF-noir in Thomas Carl Sweterlitsch’s “The Disposable Man”.
We follow that on the 21st of Feb, with our reprint for this issue, Nick Wood’s “Of Hearts and Monkeys”, an African post-apocalyptic story set in Cape Town.
And we close off the issue on the 28th of Feb with a tale by David McCool about an old man recollecting the story of “Billy Bogroll”, the town paedophile.

We introduce a new book reviewer with this issue; Deon van Heerden, who starts off his tenure with us with a review of The Recollection by Gareth L Powell, and the graphic novel, Mazeworld by Alan Grant & Arthur Ranson.
In expectation of the release of Blue Remembered Earth next month we’ve decided to reprint our Issue 7 interview with Alastair Reynolds.
All in all an awesome issue, as I hope you’ll agree.

Issue 18 (Feb 2012)
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by Mark Sykes

WHAT’S NOT TO LIKE about teleportation? Apart from being the coolest sci-fi gadget ever (an issue for which I'll make my case in just a minute), the practical implications for humankind on this poor, soon-to-be-boned planet would be astronomical. Such as? No more fuel crisis, for a start; that alone means that if there’s one thing that the world’s scientists should put their heads together on, it’s the creation of the planet’s first instantaneous teleport device.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
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by Joe Vaz

We’ve got a great bunch of original stories for you this issue. That’s right, four brand-new, never-before-seen stories, starting with She Can See Tomorrow Today, by Mel Odom, wherein a young woman negotiates for her freedom. Concerning Harmonies and Oceans by K.A. Dean, is about a young boy whose voice could change his family’s destiny. Genevieve Rose Taylor’s The Lighthouse is an intimate, nostalgic story set in a small coastal town.
And we close off the issue with Cat Hellison’s Jack of Spades, reversed, a wholly original SF/Fantasy trip.

Our feature interview this month is with both Charlie Human and Sam Wilson, two of the five South African authors featured in Pandemonium: Stories of The Apocalypse, which itself is reviewed in this issue by Karen Jeynes.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
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