Fiction by:
Domyelle Rhyse (6th of December)
Sheila Crosby (13th of December)
Tom Jolly (2oth of December)
Cate Gardner (27th of December)

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by Joe Vaz

Our first story for the month, (available on the 6th of Dec) is “God of Light”, by Domyelle Rhyse, in which a young girl attempts a last minute escape from a ritual ceremony. “Breathing Space” by Sheila Crosby (out 13th Dec), is our novelette for the month, a hard SF piece set on a mining vessel.

Next up (on the 20th of Dec) is our end-of-the-world piece for the month, “Pulse”, by Tom Jolly and we close of the issue, and the year, (on the 27th of Dec) with our cover story, a poignant look at how the other half live, in “Six Feet Above”, by Cate Gardner.

As promised, our feature interview this month is with the baddest-ass Mexi-Can ever, Mr. Danny Trejo.
Our book review this month is a year-end review of some of our story-editor, Vianne Venter's, favourite reads for the year with particular focus on Justin Cronin’s The Passage and Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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Cover Art by Pierre Smit

Pierre Smit

one of my personal favourites, i always felt, were my drawings for "The Block," back in um..SW#03..or the one for "Deadfellas" in SW#09.. but now it probably has to be 'ANNA NIEMAND" (to cite someone else's title for it), i did for the cover of SW#12..
i think she came out damn sexy.. (it's all her though, not me..:)

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by Domyelle Rhyse

Ilkyia watched the starship arc upward, a brilliant star in the pre-dawn sky. She was fascinated by the ships of the dead, despite being only six years old. Three-year-old Reyna tugged at her hand, curious about everything but the ship above them. Their parents huddled protectively around them, keeping them close. Even though sparks of brilliant fire lit the entire city, Ilkyia imagined she knew exactly which one held her older sister.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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interview by Joe Vaz

I believe "God of Light" was one of several stories that came out of my desire to show my Lit professors (some who told me that writing SFF was a sure way not to get an A in their classes) that SFF was as good as literary fiction and revealed humanity just as well. I received A's in every class, so I think I made my point.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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by Mark Sykes

CHRISTMAS IS HERE, FOLKS, and as usual, we have a huge amount of largely unusable dross out there in the shops to get for our friends and family. One thing that proliferates more than anything else around this time is literature, and I use the word in its loosest sense. The bookshelves at CNA, WH Smith and Barnes & Noble (depending on which corner of the globe you’re in) annually groan under the weight of the offerings brought out by celebrity chefs, TV presenters, actors, musicians, models, fame whores, soap stars, designers, comedians and sometimes, writers.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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by Sheila Crosby

Dan said, "All the bigger asteroids are tracked by the computer, but there's zillions of tiny ones too. One's heading our way." After five months here, getting into his spacesuit was simple. The trick was to get one foot firmly fastened into the suit before you took the other out of its metal-soled shoe. If you didn't, you found yourself floating weightlessly around the airlock, magnetic floor or no magnetic floor.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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interview by Joe Vaz

I'd love a temporary job in space, but I don't think I could live without walking in the woods. Like Dan, I think I'd miss things like cockroaches. Well, maybe not cockroaches, but certainly spiders' webs and moss and birdsong.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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by Tom Jolly

The interesting difference between doctors and scientists is that scientists often ignore the potentially deadly repercussions of their activities, so immersed are they in their work that they fail to see all the dark applications of it. If people die, it's not their fault. As long as your motives are pure, no blame can be laid at your doorstep.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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interview by Joe Vaz

I think we're only a few mutations away from a serious pandemic at any time. All you need is one really nasty airborne virus with a two-week incubation period, and WHAM, it's bye-bye humans.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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by Vianne Venter

It’s been a very good year for reading. Bizarrely, this is largely due to the birth of my daughter, which forced me to sit still for the first time in, well, my life really. Just about the only thing you can do with a baby sleeping on your lap is read – terrible, I know, but I bore my sentence bravely.

From Issue 16 (Oct 2011)
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interview by Joe Vaz & Vianne Venter

DANNY TREJO HAS ONE of the most iconic faces in movies today, yet very few people know his name. Ask anyone if they’ve ever heard of him and most people will say no, then show them a picture and watch the recognition bloom across their face.
For nearly three decades Danny Trejo has been playing every type of convict or bad guy under the sun but thanks to Robert Rodriguez’s casting of him as a Mexican “Q”, who provides all the gadgets and toys to the heroes, in his Spy Kids movies, Danny Trejo’s popularity has evolved beyond “bad guy to have in your film”, to “fun guy to have in your film”.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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by Cate Gardner

“The Devil pulled the string on his attic door and all the people tumbled down,” Pastor Baest said, recounting recent history. “Soil shot up in an almighty plume, affixing its weight to the sky and colouring the world sepia. Amen.”

“Amen,” the children repeated.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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interview by Joe Vaz

As I was setting the story from the zombie's viewpoint I figured grunts would not be the way to go. A narrative of grunt, grunt, grunt, ugh, argh, grunt, grunt might have been off-putting.

From Issue 16 (Dec 2011)
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