She Can See Tomorrow Today,
by Mel Odom (10th of January)
Concerning Harmonies and Oceans,
by K.A. Dean (17th of January)
The Lighthouse,
by Genevieve Rose Taylor (24th of January)
Jack of Spades, reversed,
by Cat Hellisen  (31st of January)

DeliciousFacebookLiveJournalDiggRedditStumbleUponTumblrTwitterShare This

by Joe Vaz

We’ve got a great bunch of original stories for you this issue. That’s right, four brand-new, never-before-seen stories, starting with She Can See Tomorrow Today, by Mel Odom, wherein a young woman negotiates for her freedom. Concerning Harmonies and Oceans by K.A. Dean, is about a young boy whose voice could change his family’s destiny. Genevieve Rose Taylor’s The Lighthouse is an intimate, nostalgic story set in a small coastal town.
And we close off the issue with Cat Hellison’s Jack of Spades, reversed, a wholly original SF/Fantasy trip.

Our feature interview this month is with both Charlie Human and Sam Wilson, two of the five South African authors featured in Pandemonium: Stories of The Apocalypse, which itself is reviewed in this issue by Karen Jeynes.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
Read more »
Cover Art by Vianne Venter

Vianne Venter

Joe has always loved this piece, so when he decided that come-hell-or-high-water he was going to use it for this cover, I attempted an overlay layer of butterfly images at short notice, though in the end we decided to go without it.

Read more »

by Mel Odom

Even before Special Agent Thompson took the 8x10 photograph from inside his sleek briefcase, Emily Cooksey knew she had seen the man previously - eight days ago. “No.” She told the lie without inflection, without pause, just as she’d told the man her name was Mary Smith. She was good at lying and would be ashamed of it, if it weren’t so necessary in her life.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
Read more »

by Joe Vaz

I’m really lucky. I can work within an established world/setting/context with the same zeal that I approach creating my own worlds. There is a different framework of rules, but the work is essentially the same. Create a hero, give him/her something interesting to do, add lots of conflict, and keep the pacing up.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
Read more »

by Mark Sykes

WHAT’S NOT TO LIKE about teleportation? Apart from being the coolest sci-fi gadget ever (an issue for which I'll make my case in just a minute), the practical implications for humankind on this poor, soon-to-be-boned planet would be astronomical. Such as? No more fuel crisis, for a start; that alone means that if there’s one thing that the world’s scientists should put their heads together on, it’s the creation of the planet’s first instantaneous teleport device.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
Read more »

by K.A. Dean

The Third City drifted slowly across cresting water - a blue-green sheet of rippling shades, sunlight dancing - moving against the wind. A floating island of glass and gold and silver, frozen towers like ice, basking. Behind, left by the motion of the massive propellers beneath water's surface, a faint trail of froth.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
Read more »

interview by Joe Vaz

The initial seed came from a radio documentary on one of the last great castratos (though I forget the name of the individual). They talked in great detail about how the best castratos were adored and pampered and doted on by the aristocracy. That germinated and ended up combining with an old idea (the floating cities on a flooded

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
Read more »

by Genevieve Rose Taylor

When she's gone, I realize that I've put my hand on my belly, like she did. I wonder if her secret is the same as mine, or if hers was worse. I still can't sleep, and why bother trying? Sleep steals away the only hours I have left, so I make myself another cup of coffee, and return to the window.

From Issue 17 (Dec 2011)
Read more »

interview by Joe Vaz

It's a ballad about ghosts and a lighthouse, but the similarities end there. The ghost in the rain was inspired by the ghost in the song.

From Issue 17 (Jan 2012)
Read more »

review by Karen Jeynes

edited by Anne C. Perry and Jared Shurin Published by Jurassic London PB 288 pages RRP £14.99 (Kindle £2.48)

I’ve always believed that giving writers a tight brief sparks them to greater heights of creativity and innovation, and this anthology is evidence to just that. This collection brings together a wide array of voices with writing inspired by John Martin’s apocalyptic paintings. Among the mix of contributors are South Africans Lauren Beukes, SL Grey, Charlie Human and Sam Wilson.

From Issue 17 (Jan 2012
Read more »

interview by Joe Vaz & Karen Jeynes

I OFTEN WISH I could bring the readers of Something Wicked along with me to the interviews I do. They are always a lot more fun and interesting than comes across on the page, mostly because for the written interview I have to edit all the tangents out for brevity. Sam Wilson and Charlie Human were no exception.

From Issue 17 (Jan 2012)
Read more »

by Cat Hellisen

We must be close to New Londinium by now. The jungle is thinning and this little clearing is as good a place as any to stop and rest. My current employer sits hunched on a fallen log thick with fungi and bottle-green creeping vines. She holds her hands against her face, palms over her eyes. Her hair has turned black as feathers.

From Issue 17 (Jan 2012)
Read more »

interview by Joe Vaz

Oh see, this is where I reveal what a sad person I am. The title was a pun and a really, really pointless in-joke. Jack of Spades was a play on jack-of-all-trades, and Jacek is the jack of spades to Queen Vicky's queen of hearts. Um, also, you can't reverse a jack of spades. You can however, reverse a page of swords. So yeah.

From Issue 17 (Jan 2012)
Read more »