Posts Tagged ‘Angel Propps’

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Inkless Media & eKhaya present the Something Wicked Anthology of Speculative Fiction, Volume Two.
We are delighted to announce that eKhaya will be co-publishing the Something Wicked Anthology of Speculative Fiction, Volume Two with Joe Vaz and Vianne Venter at Inkless Media. Joe and Vianne have been tireless nurturers of South African and international genre talent for years, and are thrilled to have eKhaya lend their support to this anthology.

 

The awesome cover art has been illustrated by celebrated South African artist, Vincent Sammy, a Something Wicked stalwart.

Volume Two marks the official transition of Something Wicked from magazine to annual anthology, featuring 25 brand new stories by writers from South Africa and abroad; seasoned veterans and first-timers brought together in a single book containing tales of post-apocalyptic dystopias, alternate realities, far-future science fiction and good old-fashioned blood-chilling horror, edited and compiled by the doting godparents of South African genre fiction, Joe Vaz and Vianne Venter. Let your mind wander across distant galaxies, down darkened alleys, and across oceans of floating cities and let Something Wicked be your guide.
Let the journey begin. “Joe and Vianne are talent-spotters … par excellence.” – Lauren Beukes

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Published by eKhaya & Inkless Media
Paperback: 388 pages

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by Vianne Venter

In my hometown there was an apocalypse. The mills all closed, the work moved elsewhere. People lost their jobs, their homes. Neighborhoods that had once been filled with working families became centers of poverty and drug abuse. People took jobs making less money than they had ever made, (and they were the lucky ones), many more went on public assistance and pride, both personal and civic, crumbled. The neighborhood I described is the neighborhood in which I grew up..

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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by Angel Propps

Lou Williams stood in front of the huge window that dominated most of his living room. One hand twitched at the curtains he had moved aside just enough to peek through. The other rested on the butt of the old revolver he had taken down from its box in the back of the closet. A dreamlike expression rode his wrinkled old face as he stood there, caught between wondering if that window could indeed act like a magnifying glass and burn right through him, and the vivid memory of bringing his wife Sally home to that house for the first time.

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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