Something Wicked, October 2011 (Issue 14)

by Joe Vaz

When I was born, in the early 70’s, man was still travelling to the moon. In fact I was 4 months and 13 days old when the crew of Apollo 17 touched down on the lunar surface, and four days later, Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt were the last human beings to set foot there.
That was 39 years ago.

From Issue 14 (Oct 2011)
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interview by Joe Vaz

Engaging the Idrl was inspired by the story of a specialist truck driver in the British Territorial Army who tragically committed suicide in August of 2004 after returning from the Iraq war. The gentleman in question experienced first-hand the horrifying incident of the chocolate bar described in the story. I was so moved (and disturbed) by it that I had to respond by committing my feelings to print.

From Issue 14 (Oct 2011)
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by Davin Ireland

The desert here is pink and rocky and shrouded in darkness for much of the day. The excavation site is slashed with grey spills of rubble that could be collapsed towers or random seams of granite. To the east, great clouds of mortar dust boil across the plains, scouring the arid landscape, depriving it of fresh growth. Only the Idrl remain.

From Issue 14 (Oct 2011)
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review by Sarah Lotz

Published by Generation Next Publications PB 258 pages RRP R150 (Kindle £2.14 My father's funeral had been that morning, and Kevin thought a night out would be the best way to take my mind off how he'd died. It hadn't helped. All I could think about was that I hadn't been able to say good-bye or tell him that I loved him. I couldn't even get drunk and forget about it. I couldn't pretend that I was okay and put on a happy face for the sake of Kevin and his friends. As a result we cut the night short, which irritated Kevin's friends and I was once again the party pooper. Kevin had been gone for what seemed like a few seconds when everything that I knew and trusted in my life changed forever. From Issue 14 (Oct 2011)
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interview by Joe Vaz

There were times when I was writing it, when I'd look at what I'd just written and think: I can't believe I just wrote that. They're going to crucify me for this. You're not supposed to say things like this, let alone write them. But then I realised that if I did tone it down or censor it that I would be a coward and that I would be cheating the story. I think that it's important to be true to the story and that as a writer, it's my job to push boundaries and explore those taboo subjects.

From Issue 14 (Oct 2011)
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