Posts Tagged ‘Issue 20’

by Vianne Venter

I first heard of phookas when I was a child, watching the Jimmy Stewart movie, Harvey, about a giant playful and invisible phooka. When I read about the phooka of lore, though, I learned it is a darker creature. Though it has a borderline malevolent personality, I wondered what would happen if pushed to the edge.

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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by C.S. Fuqua

The needle of light winks. Machinery rumbles, and he cowers against the dirt wall. Something brushes against his leg as a shadow scuttles into a corner. He kicks, and bone and flesh give way under his boot. He takes the rat into his hands and lifts the carcass to his lips, but then his shoulders sink. He drops his hands to his lap, weary of the struggle. The light winks again. The door rattles. This time he will make them shoot.

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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by Mark Sykes

The following is not a list of movies you must see before you die. If you were to accidentally electrocute yourself having not seen the full list, I really wouldn’t give a tinker’s cuss (nothing personal, you understand – although I might laugh a bit); neither would I come to your funeral and rave over your coffin as it was being lowered into the cold earth, brandishing the list and pointing to the ones you didn’t see. Anyway, since you’d actually be dead, you’d probably have bigger, not to mention otherworldly, fish to fry.
Let’s simply call this a list of great movies and shorts that I’ve enjoyed in the past, and would like to share; some I only saw once but never forgot, some I’ve seen over and over again without getting tired of them. So, in no particular order of preference:

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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by Vianne Venter

In my hometown there was an apocalypse. The mills all closed, the work moved elsewhere. People lost their jobs, their homes. Neighborhoods that had once been filled with working families became centers of poverty and drug abuse. People took jobs making less money than they had ever made, (and they were the lucky ones), many more went on public assistance and pride, both personal and civic, crumbled. The neighborhood I described is the neighborhood in which I grew up..

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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by Angel Propps

Lou Williams stood in front of the huge window that dominated most of his living room. One hand twitched at the curtains he had moved aside just enough to peek through. The other rested on the butt of the old revolver he had taken down from its box in the back of the closet. A dreamlike expression rode his wrinkled old face as he stood there, caught between wondering if that window could indeed act like a magnifying glass and burn right through him, and the vivid memory of bringing his wife Sally home to that house for the first time.

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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